Language Shift – an exhibition of endangered words

Language Shift at Southbank Centre's National Poetry Library, Envy by Mary Kuper

Language Shift at Southbank Centre’s National Poetry Library. Envy by Mary Kuper

This summer, Southbank Centre, London, is showcasing Language Shift, an exhibition of work by artist Mary Kuper created response to the National Poetry Library’s collection of poems in European languages.

In many ways, poetry is the written form that most celebrates and utilises the power and nuance of language. The Endangered Poetry Project has been launched by  in a bid to preserve poems written as launched its Endangered Poetry Project with the aim of collecting poems in at-risk languages, and acknowledging the disturbing fact that languages die out at the rate of one every two weeks.

Language Shift at Southbank Centre's National Poetry Library_works by Mary Kuper; photograph by Pete Woodhead3

“For the Language Shift exhibition, Kuper has created visual works which exist as equivalent worlds to the poems they respond to and collectively create a visual map,” says Chris McCabe, Southbank Centre’s National Poetry Librarian. “These new works respond to languages that feature on UNESCO’s world map of endangered languages including Breton, Alsatian, Sardinian and Shetlandic.”

Language Shift at Southbank Centre's National Poetry Library_works by Mary Kuper; photograph by Pete Woodhead3

If you’ve ever listened to poetry read aloud in a language you’re unfamiliar with, you’ll be aware how immediately relatable cadence and delivery can render words in verse, making connections at unexpected emotional and cerebral levels. Kuper’s work is supported by a display of poetry films and poems in translation from the Talking Transformations project, curated by Ricarda Vidal and Manuela Perteghella, which offers a chance to sample this first hand. The poems shared inTalking Transformations focus on the idea of ‘home’ and ‘migration’ and reveal part of the poems’ journey through  the UK, Romania, Poland, France and Spain.

The perfect chance to take in the resonance of Europe’s diverse languages and shared human experiences.

Language Shift at Southbank Centre's National Poetry Library; works by Mary Kuper_photograph by Pete Woodhead2

Image credit: works by Mary Kuper; photographs by Pete Woodhead.

Language Shift is on at National Poetry Library (Level 5, Blue side, Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre, London SE1 8XX) until 23rd September 2018, and is free to visit.

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Writing prompt – signpost

Too Far_photo credit Judy DarleyIf you’ve visited Bristol, you may be aware that certain sign-posts have been added too with helpful advice. This one seems like it could be a warning against heading to Temple Meads Station and actually leaving the city. On the other hand, there’s something enticing about following a sign that invites you to go too far!

Bristol is wonderfully blessed with a population that loves to contribute a hint of weirdness and magic to the urban landscape. To me it speaks volumes about the local culture and personality.

Where could this sign lead? What would you put up in its place to reflect your own neighbourhood’s character?

If you write or create something prompted by this, please send an email to judydarley(at)iCloud.com to let me know. With your permission, I’ll publish it on SkyLightRain.com.

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The Aesthetica Creative Writing Award

MShed cr Judy DarleyThe Aesthetica Creative Writing Award celebrates outstanding short fiction and poetry from around the world. The deadline for entering the award is 31st August 2018.

Prizes include publication within Aesthetica Creative Writing Anthology and £1,000 for each category winner. Winner of the short fiction competition will receive a consultation with literary agency Redhammer Management, while the Poetry winner will have a Full Membership to The Poetry Society. To whet your appetite for creating more literary works, the winners will also receive, a subscription to Granta and books courtesy of Bloodaxe Books and Vintage Books.

There’s no theme – just submit your finest story or poem offering your own unique window on a slice of the world!

Fiction entries should be no more than 2,000 words each and poetry entries should be no more than 40 lines each. Both short fiction and poetry entries should be written in English. It costs £12 to enter the Poetry category and £18 to enter the Short Fiction category.

Timeline

  • Now until – 31 August 2018: Entries open
  • September 2018: Judging begins
  • December 2018: Winners and finalists are announced
  • December 2018: Publication of winners and finalists in the Aesthetica Creative Writing Annual

For full details, visit www.aestheticamagazine.com/creative-writing-award
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Writing prompt – farm

Toy farm animals cr Judy DarleyI encountered this herd of cows, chickens and other beasts on a random table-top recently, and was briefly dazzled by a wave of nostalgia. Did you play with these as a child? Did you watch someone smaller play with these? Did you imagine being really small and strolling among them?

Write a piece that plays with time, memory and scale inspired by these farm animals.

If you write or create something prompted by this, please send an email to judydarley(at)iCloud.com to let me know. With your permission, I’ll publish it on SkyLightRain.com.

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