Submit your novel for the Virginia Prize For Fiction

Virginaia-woolfs-house-richmond-hogarth-press-begun-hereBlue PlaqueAurora Metro, the Twickenham-based arts organisation, is searching for the best new fiction by a woman writing in English. The winner will receive £1,000 and a conditional offer of publication by Aurora Metro Books.

The Voyage Out by Virginia Woolf

The 5th Virginia Prize for Fiction is now open  for submissions

The prize is open to any woman (over 18) around the world, writing in English.

The novel can be of any genre but cannot have been published or self-published before.

This biennial prize was launched in 2009 as a tribute to Virginia Woolf who wrote her first novel, The Voyage Out, while living an Hogarth House on Paradise Road in Richmond, where she and her husband Leonard also founded the Hogarth Press in 1917.

The prize’s founder, publisher Cheryl Robson, hopes that “by naming this prize in Virginia Woolf’s memory we will inspire women to find their voice and contribute to the pantheon of great women writers.”

The prize is open to any woman (over 18) around the world, writing in English. The novel can be of any genre but cannot have been published or self-published before. You must submit your entire completed novel to be eligible. The entry fee is £10 per manuscript.

The closing date for entries is 1st October 2017.

Previous winners include Shambala Junction by Dipika Mukherjee, which won the 4th Virginia Prize for Fiction, and The Leipzig Affair by Fiona Rintoul, which won the 3rd Virginia Prize for Fiction in 2013 and was dramatised for BBC R4’s Book At Bedtime. Read by Douglas Henshall and Indira Varma, it was broadcast in March 2015.

Kipling and Trix by Mary HamerMary Hamer, who won in the 2nd Virginia Prize for Fiction in 2011 with her novel Kipling & Trix, is the current Chair of the Kipling Society, and is giving a host of talks across the country about her novel and his life.

Louise Soraya Black who won the inaugural prize in 2009 for her novel Pomegranate Sky, which Fay Weldon described as “vividly written, fresh and eloquent”, has given up her law career to pursue writing full-time.

Could you be next?  For more information about the prize and to enter, go to aurorametro.com/the-virginia-prize-for-fiction.

Find out more about Virginia Woolf’s time in Richmond.

Under the gaze of Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf is one of those literary legends it’s easy to feel you know, thanks to her crisp, taut prose and thoroughly frank diary entries. Now you can get to know the great author in a whole new way, with an exhibition to be held at Britain’s National Portrait Gallery.

Virginia Woolf by Vanessa Bell 1912 © Estate of Vanessa Bell, courtesy Henrietta Garnett cr National Trust, Charles Thomas

Virginia Woolf by Vanessa Bell 1912 © Estate of Vanessa Bell, courtesy Henrietta Garnett cr National Trust, Charles Thomas.

Virginia Woolf: Art, Life and Vision will feature painted portraits, photographs, drawings and rare archival material, including a letter from Virginia to her sister, Vanessa Bell, written shortly before her suicide.

Guest curated by biographer Frances Spalding, the exhibition promises to explore Woolf’s many facets, novelist to public figure, intellectual to campaigner, as well as offering vivid glimpses of her private life. Via an array of archival material, including letters to and from her friends and acquaintances, extracts from her personal diaries, and original books that were first printed through the Virginia’s beloved Hogarth Press you’ll get to meander through Woolf’s early life, literary interests and remarkable achievements, absorb her fascination with London, awareness of modernity, and her developing feminist and political views.

Virginia Woolf in an Armchair by Vanessa Bell, 1912 © National Portrait Gallery, London

Virginia Woolf in an Armchair by Vanessa Bell, 1912 © National Portrait Gallery, London

For me, these two portrait of Woolf by her sister seems to offer a glimpse the great writer in a moment’s introversion.

I wholeheartedly intend to find the time to go along, but can’t promise I won’t be pretending to myself that I’m actually spending the afternoon with the literary lady. Wouldn’t it be fab to discover her take on today’s political, feminist and cultural issues?

VIRGINIA WOOLF: ART, LIFE AND VISION runs from 10 July until 26 October 2014 at the National Portrait Gallery, London.