Ride the art in Vilnius

Painting Routers art initiativeHave you ever taken a journey on a piece of art? Now you can take an epic ride on one of Vilnius’ trolleybuses covered in contemporary art. Running for the second consecutive year, the Painting Routers art initiative has transformed five trolleybuses into Vilnius, Lithuania, into canvases painted on by five teams of well-known young artists from Lithuania and Estonia.

“The novelty of using public transport as art lies in the subjectivity of painting and its corporeal and incorporeal duality rather than  in the trolley’s medium as something new and unexpected,” explains the project’s coordinator Darius Jarusevicius. “The aim of Painting Routers is to question the stable  identity of painting and the sustainability of its corporeal actualisation, and to highlight the nomadic nature of art.”

The idea of Painting Routers sprang from art duo Polyrabbit.Duplicate (Inna Shilina and Darius Jaruševičius). “Our painterly practice is based on duplication and the repetition of our own paintings on different mediums: animation, digital  appearance, corporeal surfaces with very different densities and situations of exposition,” says Darius. “It was a dream of the Polyrabbit.Duplicate duo to find means of creating visual art in non-static public spaces. When we hit on the trolleybuses was the answer, it became clear that it would be good not only for our own painterly practice, but for contemporary painting in general, so we invited more artists to join in.”

Painting Routers art initiative

Artists involved in the project for 2018 include Goda Lukaitė, Donata Minderytė, Monika Plentauskaitė, Alexei Gordin, Kazimieras Brazdžiūnas, Vita Opolskytė, Kristina Ališauskaitė, Rosanda Sorakaitė, Kristi Kongi, and Rosanda Sorakaitė.

This year’s Painting Routers initiative aims to encourage dialogue on the #metoo movement, femininity, sensations, and sexuality. “A real-life social media wall will revert back to digital when people share their experiences of the Painting Router works, creating a cycle,” says Darius. “Taken out of the galleries, the art becomes accessible to everyone.”

The trolleybuses will be riding  the streets of Vilnius until October 2018, offering plenty of time to spot all five works and ride each one as the mood takes you!

More information about the project and about tourism in Vilnius visit www.vilnius-tourism.lt/en.

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Writing prompt – canoe

Canoe by Hattie BuckwellThis beautiful picture is part of artist Hattie Buckwell‘s tantalising Explore The World print. Send your imagination on a journey and conjure up an adventure – it could be across oceans or over mountains, or simply through an Ikea on a hectic weekend!

What challenges could your intrepid travellers encounter? What might they discover about themselves and each other?

Read my interview with Hattie Buckwell.

If you write or create something prompted by this, please send an email to judydarley(at)iCloud.com to let me know. With your permission, I’ll publish it on SkyLightRain.com.

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A global odyssey

Starry Roundscape by Hattie Buckwell

Starry Roundscape by Hattie Buckwell

Discovering the imaginative illustrations created by Hattie Buckwell is a little like finding an opening in the back of your wardrobe, and stumbling out into the version of the world you always hoped was true.

It’s an impression only deepened by the shape of her Dreamscapes Within Roundscapes series, offering the sense of looking through a telescope or porthole.

“I have a bit of thing for circles, painting within a circle is much closer to what we see through circular pupils,” Hattie admits. “Our field of vision is somewhere between a circle and an oval so I love this way of illustrating.” 

Mountains to Climb Oceans to Swim

Mountains to Climb Oceans to Swim by Hattie Buckwell

Inspiration often comes to light when Hattie is on the move. My series of ‘Homes of the World’ came from a love of travelling – imagining what its like to live up a treehouse or surrounded by snow-capped mountains,” Hattie says. “I love to paint places I’ve been (or want to go to), recording what it feels like to be in a particular part of the world.”

Homes of the World by Hattie Buckwell

Homes of the World by Hattie Buckwell

As you might expect, lots of Hattie’s illustrations stem from her love of walking amid nature, and from her passion for travel. “I always have a sketchbook on me and draw a lot, bringing together elements from different ideas into paintings later.”

Hattie also loves watching documentaries and reading ‘proper nature encyclopaedias’. “I really enjoy of infographics of all kinds, learning with pictures, symbols on maps,” she says. “Some of my illustrations came from a want for a visual guide to something, for example, ‘Eat Fresh’ is an illustrated guide to what food is in season.”

Eat Fresh by Hattie Buckwell

Eat Fresh by Hattie Buckwell

In fact, many of Hattie’s artwork titles read like instructions for living well and enjoying life: Eat fresh, explore, feast, swim wild…

There’s a real sense of narrative in Hattie’s illustrations, which I find irresistibly enticing.

I often work on a series of illustrations, with individual pieces coming together to tell a story,” she comments. “I recently completed my ‘Explore’ Series, playing with illustrating tiny people exploring vast natural landscapes. Some by canoe, some skiing down slopes, some pulled by huskies. Through illustration I can create miniature worlds for the viewer to explore. I enjoy adding tiny details to spot little going-on’s within the tiny worlds seen in the paintings.”

Surfing by Hattie Buckwell

Surfing by Hattie Buckwell

Various elements of Hattie’s past and present influences these tiny worlds.

I grew up doing house-swaps with my family, swapping homes with people living all over the world,” she recalls. “So much more than a holiday, it allows you to really get a feel for life on the other side of the world. I feel very lucky to have so many memories and photos to draw inspiration from. Now I live in Bristol, such a thriving creative community and always so much to see and do – it is a constant source of energy to make.”

When I first picked up one of Hattie’s business cards, she described herself as a textile artist, a element of her past that immediately intrigued me, especially with reference to its impact on her art today.

Koi by Hattie Buckwell

Koi by Hattie Buckwell

“I trained as a textile artist – my work was based around colour, colour mixing, traditional dyeing and print techniques, and creating repeat prints from my illustrations,” she tells me. “At the beginning of a painting I still use a lot of the same processes of testing colours, playing with different layers of detail. I love to dye and play with textiles, but my first love was always in drawing & painting. The simplicity of working on sheets of paper, I feel freer to concentrate on the illustration itself.”

She still finds a lot of  satisfaction in creating a design which repeats perfectly, “like ‘Koi’. In the future I would love to work on some more repeat illustrations which could be printed on fabric, but for now I’m still revelling in the simplicity of paper and colour.”

Swim Wild by Hattie Buckwell

Swim Wild by Hattie Buckwell

Being an artist suit Hattie’s free spirit perfectly. “I love that every day is different, and that I can work on lots of different projects at once,” she says. “If it’s a sunny Monday I can just go and explore or spend the day planting in the garden if I want to. When I first went to art collage, I couldn’t believe that I could work on creative projects all day. Now I really couldn’t imagine doing anything else! It’s been a lot of hard work to get to where I am today, but I’m so proud to be able to do this full-time.”

Feast by Hattie Buckwell

Feast by Hattie Buckwell

Hattie co-owns Blaze shop and studio at 84 Colston Street in Central Bristol, “so naturally this has the best selection of my work. It’s a co-operative run by artists and we are proud to sell the work of more than 60 Makers living in Bristol, from printmaking to ceramics to original paintings. It’s right in the middle of the Christmas Steps Arts Quarter which has so many fantastic independent shops to explore.”

Check out Hattie’s website www.hattiebuckwell.co.uk to see more of her work and her online shop, and find a list of current stockists. Hattie’s artworks make great writing prompts too!

Are you an artist or do you know an artist who would like to be showcased on SkyLightRain.com? Get in touch at judydarley(at)iCloud.com.SaveSave

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Writing prompt – travel

Twin Blue and Green Lakes, Sete Cidades cr Judy DarleyI often find myself moved to write strange and dreamy fictions while travelling. For instance, my story Two Pools of Water, inspired by a trip to the Azores, and published this week by dear damsels.

My story draws on local myths, and the yearning of youth.

My sister Bia leads me to a balcony. The twin lakes show beyond, half-shrouded in cloud. With the sky overcast, the green and blue are harder to see. She tells me the fairytale I’ve heard a thousand times before, of the shepherd and the princess, embracing on the bridge and weeping through their farewells. ‘Her green eyes made the emerald lake, and his blue eyes made the sapphire one,’ she says. ‘He cried more, which is why the blue lake is so much bigger.’

Think of a place you’ve visited far from and as unalike home as possible, and use that as the setting for a story. If you can weave in a bit of local legend, so much the better!

If you write or create something prompted by this, please send an email to judydarley(at)iCloud.com to let me know. With your permission, I’ll publish it on SkyLightRain.com.

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Textures of the River Lea

Bow Arts Raw Materials Textiles Installation View 74When is a ream of rope more than a ream of rope? When it’s an art installation, of course!

Running until 24th June 2018, Raw Materials: Textiles celebrates the historic textile trade that once thrived along the River Lea. Taking place at Bow Arts Nunnery Gallery (Nunnery Gallery, Bow Arts, 181 Bow Road, London E3 2SJ) and supported by The National Lottery with funds awarded through the Heritage Lottery Fund, it’s a chance to experience the textures of London’s textile heritage in vivid detail.

It’s also an exceptional opportunity to soak up stories of silk-weaving, calico printing, jute spinning and the invention of dye colours – the jobs that once areas including Hackney Wick, Stratford, West Ham and Walthamstow with activity.

Images, from left printed cotton, Robert Jones & Co, Old Ford, English 1769 cr Victoria and Albert Museum, London, family photograph, courtesy Sam Stockman, Freya Gabie, research experiment for Before, After and Between 2018 cr Freya Gabie

Images, from left printed cotton, Robert Jones & Co, Old Ford, English 1769 cr Victoria and Albert Museum, London, family photograph, courtesy Sam Stockman, Freya Gabie, research experiment for Before, After and Between 2018 cr Freya Gabie

Exhibits include loans of historic fabric produced in the area, such as the Georgian calico from Old Ford courtesy of the V&A, shown above. There’s also a River Lea-inspired design by William Morris.

Bow Arts Raw Materials Textiles Installation View High Res-45

The curators say: “Newly commissioned work will also be unveiled from resident artists Freya Gabie,whose conceptual sculpture explores trinitrotoluene, the yellow dye that was later used as an explosive – and Sarah Desmarias, whose textiles use traditional dye and printing methods, including the dye-fast use of the colour madder that was first patented in Hackney Wick.”

Bow Arts Raw Materials Textiles Installation View High Res-61

They add: “Working with project partners that include local archives, London College of Fashion, Jewish Museum London and the V&A, much of the exhibition content has been driven by a community steering group, keen to unearth the stories of their local area’s past.”

Alongside the show you can dig into a lively event programme, including walking and boat tours along the River Lea, artist-led workshops and panel discussions.

Find full details here www.bowarts.org/nunnery/raw-materials-textiles.

Got an event, exhibition, venue, challenge, competition or call for submissions you’d like to draw my attention to? Send me an email at judydarley(at)iCloud(dot)com.

Writing prompt – tension

Storm in Bristol by Judy DarleySome storms sweep in fast and transform the world, if only for a few wracked hours. Create a scene with a moment of tension that builds and breaks in rhythm with rain, wind and thunder. A marital spat, sibling rivalry, two strangers misconstruing an encounter…

Try writing the scene inside, with rain streaking the window as lightning flashes, and then shove your characters out into the weather to see what impact this has.

If you write or create something prompted by this, please send an email to judydarley(at)iCloud.com to let me know. With your permission, I’ll publish it on SkyLightRain.com.

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The Fiction Desk’s Newcomer Prize

Flash fictionThe Fiction Desk’s Newcomer Prize specifically seeks writing from new authors. It’s only open to writers who have not been previously published by The Fiction Desk, and who have not yet published a novel or collection of short stories in print.

The deadline for entries is Thursday 31st May 2018.

They say: “If you’re looking for inspiration, the winning stories from last year’s competition will appear in our next anthology, due this spring. Why not subscribe to the anthology series and receive your copy as soon as it’s published?”

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Green Island

Logoa do Fogo, Sao Miguel by Judy Darley

Logoa do Fogo, Sao Miguel

My travel feature on the tranquility of Sao Miguel, one of the Azores islands, was recently published by In The Moment magazine. It provided a wonderful chance for me to re-live the beauty of that Portuguese isle.

You can buy back issues of In The Moment here. My feature appeared in issue 10.

This is my third feature published about that trip, the previous ones being published in Wedding ideas magazine and A Year In Portugal journal.

I’ve also had a piece published about a somewhat chillier visit to Iceland in Balance magazine. Love getting out to see the world and sharing my discoveries!

Icelandic Thrills feature by Judy Darley

Writing prompt – tunnels

River Avon tunnels, Bristol cr Judy DarleyIt’s so strange what you can see a hundred times without really taking in. These tunnels pass from the River Avon and travel beneath a Bristol street, but where could they lead? Why purpose might they have?

Write a story exploring these dark, watery underground channels.

If you write or create something prompted by this, please send an email to judydarley(at)iCloud.com to let me know. With your permission, I’ll publish it on SkyLightRain.com.

Book review – Dip Flash by Jonathan Pinnock

Dip Flash by Jonathan PinnockThe tales in Jonathan Pinnock’s collection quiver on the page, ready to leap in unexpected directions. Hold on tight and they’ll carry you with them, into worlds where the peculiar is commonplace and some things, including houses, refuse to stay where you left them. Pinnock manages to compress entire worlds into a paragraph or two, where the laws of physics are subtly unaligned with our own.

If you haven’t had the pleasure of Pinnock’s unique viewpoint previously, I can assure you you’re in for a heady ride. As the curator of comic poetry site Spilling Cocoa Over Martin Amis, it’s clear that irreverence is a vital ingredient of this author’s often thought-provoking works.

Meet a man whose date decides to up and leave (sounds normal? Wait till you read the tale Dinner With Sylvia), spend time with a women who carries a curiously voyeuristic creature in a octagonal cage, encounter three hundred and sixty thousand bees, and have a chat with a saint called Geoff. See through the eyes of a ventriloquist’s dummy. Discover how your Granny could become a financial asset. Learn to expect the real and unreal to knit around one another in an unfathomable intricacy. Sleep deprivation, unrequited love and astral hi-jinks all have their vital roles under Pinnock’s narrowed gaze.

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