The power of music

Judy Darley and her dad, Philip DarleyToday, Thursday 18th May 2017, is the inaugural National Memory Day, celebrating the power of creativity to aid people with memory impairments such as dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease.

My dad, Philip, is one of those people. In an effort to connect with him, I recently persuaded his former choir, the excellent City of Bristol Choir, to bring some of their finest alto, soprano, tenor and bass voices to his care home and sing. It was a magical and heart wrenching experience.

I wrote about it for The Bristol Magazine. You can read the full feature here.

An artist’s eyes

Casely-Hayford for Tate Britain Great British Walks

Casely-Hayford for Tate Britain’s Great British Walks

I’m a fan of telly channel Sky Arts, and the wonderfully engaging ways they come up with to excite audiences with a love of fine art.

Their latest offering, Tate Britain’s Great British Walks, invites half a dozen celebrities to discover the landscapes that inspired their favourite paintings, chosen from Tate’s national collection.

Flatford Mill by John Constable

Flatford Mill by John Constable

Taking part are Richard E Grant, Michael Sheen, Cerys Matthews, Miriam Margolyes, Danny Baker and Simon Callow, with artwork by John Constable, JMW Turner, William Hogarth, Alfred Wallis, William Powell Frith and Josef Herman revealing some of the UK’s most impressive scenery, from the bucolic to the squalid to the enchanting.

Norham Castle by JMW Turner, chosen by Cerys Matthews

Norham Castle by JMW Turner, chosen by Cerys Matthews

Singer, songwriter and broadcaster Cerys Matthews shares her love of Turner’s more tranquil works, as she heads to the Scottish Borders to discover the majestic Norham Castle, painted by Turner in 1798.

Along the way, art historian Gus Casely-Hayford joins the guests to reveal the stories behind and around their chosen paintings.

“I thought I knew Britain, but seeing it through an artist’s eyes was like seeing it for the very first time,” says Gus. “Stepping into worlds created by some of our greatest landscape painters and walking the very paths that they once trod has changed the way that I feel about our country.”

The Derby Day by William Powell Frith

The Derby Day by William Powell Frith

I love the idea of rediscovering familiar paintings and scenery in this visceral way beyond the art gallery’s walls, and of glimpsing insights into the actors and broadcasters who have selected them.

Tate Britain’s Great British Walks will screen in six one-hour episodes from 2nd May 2017 at 9pm on Sky Arts.

Art in motion

Art On The Run credit TenEight and Wild Rumpus CIC

© TenEight

Looking for something fun, creative and energetic to get your teeth (and feet) into? Wild Rumpus (producers of the award-winning Just So Festival and last year’s A Day At The Lake Festival) and Forestry Commission England have joined forces to present a brand new kind of fun run this May.

Art On The Run offers the chance to combine a passion for the arts, woodlands and exercising outdoors in a comical dash like no other.

Art On The Run credit Mark Carline and Wild Rumpus CIC

© Mark Carline

Those brave or wild enough to take part will enjoy a 5k hurtle through a beautiful, Forestry Commission managed landscape encountering surprising and fantastical large-scale art installations along the route. “Expect the unexpected to help you on your way,” says Wild Rumpus co-director Sarah Bird. “Look out for eccentric warm ups in advance, then race, run, scamper, chase, sprint, scurry, bound, dart, canter, gallop, jog, scuttle, trot or walk.”

Once you’ve crossed the finish line you can join in some revelry and dancing amid a soundscape of footstomping musicians. It’s idea for those spilling over with beans and eagerly imaginative.

Art On The Run cr Wild Rumpus CIC

© Wild Rumpus CIC

“We love running, we love music, we love art and we love exploring forests, so we put all this together to create a new event,” says Wild Rumpus’ other co-direct Rowan Hoban. “We’re thrilled to have found such a beautiful and inspiring site to host our first ever Art On the Run.”

Art on the Run takes place at Drinkwater Park, Prestwich, Greater Manchester on 11am, Sunday 21st May 2017. Tickets cost £20 for adults and £10 for children.

Find full information and book tickets at www.artontherun.org.uk. Please note that tickets will not be available to purchase on the day.

Follow @_wildrumpus and www.facebook.com/wildrumpuscic.

Got an event, challenge, competition or call for submissions you’d like to draw my attention to? Send me an email at Judy(at)socket creative(dot)com.

The intrinsic beauty of glass

Fallen Leaves by Simon Alderson

Fallen Leaves by Simon Alderson

Shards of diffused light bring boiled sweets and glimmering beetle casings to mind as you glance over glasswork created by Simon Alderson. Describing himself as “a designer/maker specialising in stained and fused glass”, his love of craftsmanship only flourished after he understood the potential of his artistic urges.

“I loved drawing and painting when I was growing up, so I was always going to follow some sort of creative path,” he says, “but it wasn’t until I got to art college that I realised the numerous options that could take! It’s the practical ‘hands on’ making that I loved the most.”

Splash - in construction by Simon Alderson

Splash – in construction by Simon Alderson

He admits that he’s always had a passion for stained glass. “One of my favourite places is Durham Cathedral,” he says. “I could spend hours staring at Tom Denny’s Transfiguration window. During a gap year after college I took some evening classes in stained glass, and another in ceramics.”

Simon’s ceramics tutor recommended a look at Sunderland University Glass and Ceramics department.

“From there I just fell in love with the material! Glass has an intrinsic beauty and has endless possibilities of manipulation, both hot and cold.”

The Butterfly Effect by Simon Alderson

The Butterfly Effect by Simon Alderson

There are challenges in chooses to work with such a fragile material, however.

“Glass can be a tricky medium, temperamental at times!” Simon exclaims. “One of the greatest pleasures is opening the kiln with that slight flutter of butterflies in your tummy at what awaits inside. Exploring and mastering new techniques, and learning from the mistakes and mishaps along the way is all part of it.”

Arcadia commission by Simon Alderson

Arcadia commission by Simon Alderson

Inspiration arrives in all forms. “At university I did a lot of autobiographical work,” he comments, “and nature provides a constant wealth of possibilities.  My current line of work is about letting the glass itself inspire me through colour and shape.”

Simon has spent the last couple of years exploring the medium, “experimenting and mastering different techniques with in kiln forming. Sometimes I find just letting the glass speak for itself works best, harnessing the flow, and letting one piece inform the next. With the pattern bar techniques I’ve currently been using you don’t really know what’s inside until you start cutting up the blocks of glass. Once open this then inspires the work, such as the piece Rorschach Spine (below).”

Rorschach Spine by Simon Alderson

Rorschach Spine by Simon Alderson

At the heart of it all is a delight in making.

“I just love being able to head into my studio and create,” he says. “I’m lucky to have such a great work space, and one of my greatest pleasures is sharing the love of glass through teaching – inspiring others to create and explore the versatile medium.”

Turquoise Rorschach by Simon Alderson

Turquoise Rorschach by Simon Alderson

Currently Simon is exhibiting work at Glass Designs Gallery on North Street in Bristol, and Bristol Handmade Glass, plus The Marlow Gallery up in Melbourne, Derbyshire. “I’ll be taking part in the Celebrations exhibition up in Stourbridge as part of the International Festival of Glass in August. And there are open studios in September and arts trails in October.”

Find full details at www.aldersonglass.com.

Are you an artist or do you know an artist who would like to be showcased on SkyLightRain.com? Get in touch at judy(at)socketcreative.com.

Illuminated myths

Winter Mural by Florence Jackson

Winter Mural by Florence Jackson

When visiting Cardiff recently, I happened to wander into the Wales Millennium Centre and discovered a mural of such imaginative beauty that it stopped me in my tracks. Emblazoned with tigers, dragons, foxes and more, it conjured up the sense of folk tales, myths and literature from a multitude of cultures.

The Dragons - Winter Mural by Florence Jackson

The Dragons – Winter Mural by Florence Jackson

When I got in touch with the artist, Florence Jackson, it became clear that this was no fluke.

“I remember as a child, my dad would read me bedtime stories including a lot of Roald Dahl books,” she says. “I loved the vivid imagery that came to mind and transport me to a different place, inviting me to take part in the adventure…”

Florence’s interest in illustration sprang from the same source. “Quentin Blake always stood out to me – his illustrations worked perfectly in sync with Roald Dahl’s words,” says Florence. “His fluid lines have always looked so effortless. I don’t really think I actively chose to be an artist; it was and always has been my way of communicating thoughts and ideas (and I have a lot of them!).”

Tiger - Winter Mural by Florence Jackson

Tiger – Winter Mural by Florence Jackson

She adds: “In the day to day, I’m always drawn to imagery and design, whether it’s some rice packaging at my local shop or a quirky poster in the underpass on my way to work, there’s always something visual that speaks to me.”

Florence regards illustration as “an all-encompassing art form, which allows you to work through any chosen medium. To me, it’s all about communicating ideas in a way that even people who ‘don’t really get art’ get. I don’t believe art should be exclusive.”

Kainotophobia by Florence Jackson

Kainotophobia by Florence Jackson

Florence found herself being directed towards illustration after studying Fashion & Textiles at Pembrokeshire College. “I much preferred designing and illustrating the garments than the creating part,” she admits. “Seams and hems were not my forte. When I went on to study illustration in university, I worked in photography, print, ceramics, paint… There were no boundaries. I really enjoyed this freedom of expression.”

Kraken by Florence Jackson

Kraken by Florence Jackson

I love the way Florence’s art often resembles scenes in stories, so it was no surprise to discover that her inspiration reaches beyond Quentin Blake and Roald Dahl.

“I was largely influenced by Eastern philosophy, Folk Art and Indian miniature paintings,” she says. “My projects don’t really have a beginning, middle and an end ­ they’re sort of an ongoing series that started when I first started drawing. I see everything as a story though, always wandering to myself where people at the bus stop are going. Do they live alone? Do they have a cat? Are they in love? I feel sort of obligated to make up stories for them.”

Kakorrhaphiophobia by Florence Jackson

Kakorrhaphiophobia by Florence Jackson

Florence’s commission for the Wales Millennium Centre come about when she was contacted by Lydia Meehan, the Centre’s arts and creative officer.

“Lydia had studied illustration in the year above me and had remembered my work,” says Florence. “Initially she’d spoken about doing something for the Diwali celebration, but instead it opened up into a winter theme.”

Winter Mural by Florence Jackson2

Winter Mural by Florence Jackson2

The main challenge was the sheer size of the piece, stretching a massive 8x5m sq. “I’m used to working on A3 sheets of paper normally!” Florence exclaims. “To be able to reach the space, I had to get a cherry-picker license, which was a pretty scary ordeal. I don’t even drive a normal car, so turning up to an industrial estate to navigate a seven-ton vehicle round some orange cones whilst elevated 10 meters in the air was pretty terrifying.”

Understanding when the artwork was complete was also difficult. “Knowing whether to add another tree or some more stars… It was difficult to walk away and say it was finally done.”

Winter Mural by Florence Jackson1

Winter Mural by Florence Jackson

The mural represents parallels between a wide range of winter-themed stories. “I wanted to look at the similarities within religious winter tales, such as Babushka, Diwali, Hanukah and Christmas,” says Florence. “Most involved a pilgrimage of some sort, often following a light towards warmth and shelter. This is what I wanted to convey – coming out from the cold dark night and into the warm festive spirit with people from all walks of life. I wanted to depict togetherness and safety, which I think is what we’re all looking for, especially when there seems to be so much conflict and uncertainty in the world.”

Florence considers art to simply be her means to live, eat and interpret the world.

“I still have to make money to pursue my artistic endeavors,” she says. “I think it’s just a way of seeing the world that makes things a little more magical, noticing small details that may otherwise be invisible, conjuring up fantasies of great escapes and adventures.  It’s just something I have to do, or need to do… it’s the language I speak best.”

Villains by Florence Jackson

Villains by Florence Jackson

Currently Florence is working on new material and focusing on freelance illustration, with new murals and a possible animation in the pipeline. You can find out more at florencejacksonillustration.tumblr.comwww.facebook.com/florencejacksonillustration and www.instagram.com/flow_illustrates

Are you an artist or do you know an artist who would like to be showcased on SkyLightRain.com? Get in touch at judy(at)socketcreative.com.

Hauntings in Manchester

Hello Hollow by Julian HetzelHave you visited Manchester recently? If so, you may have encountered an unsettling figure or two. Made from black plastic bags, the Hello Hollow sculptures by artist Julian Hetzel descended on the city in March.

Shifting subtly in the wind and eerily anthropomorphic, the figures are designed to be “short-lived and changeable.”

Hetzel describes the sculptures as interference. “People get confused because they don’t know what they are seeing.”

Hello Hollow and Julian Hetzel

One of the Hello Hollow sculptures with artist Julian Hetzel

He comments that in Manchester, more than anywhere else he’s taken them, including locations in Austria, the Netherlands and Germany, the reaction they’ve provoked is fear. It’s a detail he attributes to the city’s high incidences of homelessness. With their fragile ephemeral qualities, they raise questions about vulnerability, threat, and the perceived value of human life.

The installation is part of SICK! Festival, which aims to challenge the physical, mental and social challenges of life through art.

Watch Julian Hetzel discussing Hello Hollow at Manchester Metropolitan.

A creative voyage

Clipper by Judy DarleyI’ve just come to the end of an art course at the RWA in Bristol, and am already missing it immensely. The course, Illustration for Picture Books with Sam Church, offered the rare treat of devoting three hours each week for five weeks to playing with ink, paint, pencil and words.

We were each invited to devise or find a story or poem to illustrate. As you might imagine, I went in fully equipped with that side of things, keen to bring one of my short stories to life in new, visual ways.

It was energising to be in a room full of people who have such artistic talent. While I enjoyed figuring out perspective and thrilling with the success of painting a scene that made sense to me, there was just as much pleasure to be had in wandering the room at the end and seeing what my fellow students had been working on throughout the morning. Some produced works of utter beauty!

Boy and merhag by Judy Darley

For me, the biggest challenge was drawing and painting the face of my protagonist, and I’m still not satisfied with that. I think I need to try cartooning to get the character from my head to the page. It was magical, however, to discover I’m able to recreate some of the villains and accomplices from my tale, as well as the setting of the sea, sky and isle.

Evil crab by Judy Darley

The best part, however, was the chance to devote substantial chunks of time to exploring the artistic possibilities of my fiction under the gentle guidance of course leader Sam. It’s focused my growing passion for making as well as writing about art, and given me a new expressive outlet that fills me with joy.

Find upcoming RWA courses.

Unfettered nature

Snowdrop Wood by Jane Betteridge

Snowdrop Wood by Jane Betteridge

The fragrant half-silence of drawing a breath in, easing a breath out, as a woodland stirs around you is one of the most enchanting things about entering a patch of wilderness.

Likewise the headiness of standing on the brink of a stretch of land with the sea forming itself into endless shifting sculptures just beyond. These are the moments that remind us of  the sheer awe-inspiring beauty around us.

These are the moments Jane Betteridge transforms into works of art.

Blossom's Out by Jane Betteridge

Blossom’s Out by Jane Betteridge

Despite this, Jane never imagined she’d become good enough to be a professional artist, Happily, “years and years of practise and experimenting, in between getting on with my day job and raising a family, finally paid off.”

And the pay-off is enviable, as Jane now has the pleasure of being a full-time artist and experimenting with paint daily.

“In my eyes there is no other medium that comes anywhere near the vibrant characteristics of watercolour,” she says. “The way they merge and mix together on the paper, granulating and changing colour is mesmerising. Their glowing luminosity adds life to a painting.”

Berries and Bindweed by Jane Betteridge

Berries and Bindweed by Jane Betteridge

Jane sources inspiration from the ever changing nature of landscapes, as well as ephemera and other potential new materials.

“Changing seasons, country walks, hedgerows, colours, textures, textiles, old stone walls, rusting metal, and peeling paintwork, the sea, the sky, new tubes of paint or unusual watercolour mediums, old postcards, tickets and wrapping paper can all stir a desire in me to paint.”

Teasles and Honesty by Jane Betteridge

Teasles and Honesty by Jane Betteridge

It all adds texture to her art, and enjoyment to the process. Jane’s ongoing desire to experiment are vividly evident throughout the pages of her beautiful book Watercolours Unleashed. But how did the book come about?

Crashing Wave and Gulls by Jane Betteridge

Crashing Wave and Gulls by Jane Betteridge

“I spoke to Search Press when at an art fair in Nottingham and then sent them some images of my work and they asked me to go to their offices for a chat about writing the book.”

An urge to capture the sense of a moment drives much of her work.

“It’s the atmosphere of a place that makes me paint. For example, an isolated bluebell wood with the sun streaming through can be ethereal, magical and peaceful,” she says. “A rough sea lashing against the rocks can be awe-inspiring. Whether or not I do actually capture the atmosphere doesn’t really matter to me as it’s the fact that it made me create a work of art which is the most important thing.”

Bluebell Woodland by Jane Betteridge

Bluebell Woodland by Jane Betteridge

Looking at her glorious, energetic paintings, I’d say Jane captures the atmosphere with every stroke, offering glimpse of the world that can quietly infuse any room in which you choose to hang them.

Cow Parsley by Jane Betteridge

Cow Parsley by Jane Betteridge

Along with teaching, which she finds “so rewarding”, Jane feels hugely fortunate to be able to devote so much of her time to creating new work.

“I feel like I’m in heaven working as an artist,” she says. “If I wasn’t a full time artist, I’d be painting every spare minute I had anyway, so how lucky I am to be able to earn a living at what is essentially my hobby and favourite pastime.”

Poppy Field by Jane Betteridge

Poppy Field by Jane Betteridge

Jane has studios in Leicestershire and in St Ives, Cornwall. “People can make an appointment to view my work when I’m there. I’m in a couple of galleries at the moment and you can view my work on my website www.janebetteridge.com and my Facebook page Jane Betteridge Art.”

Forest Blues by Jane Betteridge

Forest Blues by Jane Betteridge

She adds: “I’ll be taking part in the St Ives September Festival (from 9th-23rd September) this year when my studio will be open to the public. I do quite a few commissions and had solo exhibitions every year for around 10 years until recently when writing the book took all of my time.”

Watercolours Unleashed has been such a success that Jane is now writing her second book for Search Press. I can’t wait to see what she creates for us this time.

Read my review of Watercolours Unleashed.

Are you an artist or do you know an artist who would like to be showcased on SkyLightRain.com? Get in touch at judy(at)socketcreative.com.

Mapping the world

Installation for Rio Olympics at the Belmond Copacabana Palace, Rio de Janeiro by Kristjana S Williams

Installation at the Belmond Copacabana Palace, Rio de Janeiro by Kristjana S Williams

From maps to globes to nature’s extravagance, Kristjana S Williams’ art encompasses the whole world.

“I grew up in Iceland where the visual landscape is entirely dictated by nature,” she says. “Whilst striking, I always felt the scenery lacked colour and it was this aspect that I craved. Having been born in the UK, I longed to return to England and discover London and its cultural diversity.”

When she was 20, Kristjana moved back to the UK and studied engineering. “I initially worked in this field, however, I had always dreamt of pursuing my artistic nature,’ she says. “I finally had a chance to do this when I got a place on the Illustration course at Central Saint Martin’s.”

Portrait for RIO 2016 by Kristjana S Williams

Portrait for RIO 2016 by Kristjana S Williams

Kristjana always had an interest in Illustration. “This passion stems from an early age when I discovered maps in a Cartography class at school in Iceland,” she says. “I used to draw the maps and fill them in, I would imagine where I would go and what I would do and that was the happiest I have ever been.”

Globe by Kristjana S Williams

Globe by Kristjana S Williams

At first, Kristjana’s drew most elements by hand, “but I later discovered the technique of using Victorian engravings which I recoloured and reinvented making them individual. I started to combine these with my old love of maps and was pleased with the result I got.”

Falin Viltur Blar Solar Palm III detail by Kristjana S Williams

Falin Viltur Blar – Solar Palm III detail by Kristjana S Williams

Her creations form from three key ingredients.

“Colour, narrative and shape are all equally crucial components in my work and it is the combination of all of them in unison that make a piece successful.”

Mood image by Kristjana S Williams

Mood image by Kristjana S Williams

These days, Kristjana receives commissions from large corporations as well as members of the public, many of whom “have seen a large 3D artwork I have done for a big client, such as The Knowledge for The Shard.”

The Knowledge in the Shard by Kristjana S Williams

The Knowledge in the Shard by Kristjana S Williams

Clients have included a series of glorious butterfly and bird-infused installations for the Belmond Copacabana Palace in Rio de Janeiro for the 2016 Olympics.

“Sometimes people fall in love with an element the work and want something of their own,” she says. “Once I have gathered a good body of research on the individual and have got to know them, the design begins to flow quite freely.”

Kristjana relishes the independence that comes with being a freelance artist. “Expressing yourself visually is such a great feeling.”

WBTC London Cushion by Kristjana S Williams

WBTC London Cushion by Kristjana S Williams

You can see Kristjana’s large commissions at The Shard, The Connaught and The Trinity restaurant. “We will soon be opening a pop up shop at Harrods, which will stock new products and limited edition prints, which will be exciting.”

Find out more at www.kristjanaswilliams.com.

Are you an artist or do you know an artist who would like to be showcased on SkyLightRain.com? Get in touch at judy(at)socketcreative.com.

The thrill of illustration

A scene from Was Schwimmt Denn Da by Henning Lohlein

An illustration from Was Schwimmt Denn Da by Henning Lohlein

Hippos, pigs, seals and fish, not to mention the occasional elephant in swimming trunks, cavort through the pages of Henning Löhlein’s picture books. Designed to amuse and enthrall, they wriggle with life.

“I always liked drawing,” Henning recalls. “Having grown up in Germany, I spent two years taking foundation art studies in Toulon France, but I was torn between graphic design and fine art.”

A scene from Was Schwimmt Denn Da by Henning Lohlein2

A scene from Was Schwimmt Denn Da by Henning Lohlein

Henning travelled to Bristol on an Erasmus exchange programme, and here discovered illustration, “which formed the right mixture between working to a brief and having the freedom to express one’s own ideas. I finished my studies with an MA in editorial design and narrative illustration at Brighton University. Since then I have taught on the illustration course as a visiting lecturer.”

Illustration for the Financial Times by Henning Lohlein

Illustration for the Financial Times by Henning Lohlein

Henning’s editorial work includes illustrations for the Guardian, the Financial Times and Country Life, as well as magazine covers. “I like to find the freedom in the constraints of illustration, be it for editorial jobs, or in children’s books,” he says.

A scene from Das Leben Ist Bunt illustrated by Henning Lohlein

A scene from Das Leben Ist Bunt illustrated by Henning Lohlein

His love of children’s books began when, after 15 years of working as an editorial illustrator, he realised he wanted “to have a longer ‘shelf life’ for my illustrations. I had started drawing more and more animals in my magazine illustrations, so the step to children’s book illustration was not very far.”

A scene from Ich Ware So Gerne illustrated by Henning Lohlein

A scene from Ich Ware So Gerne illustrated by Henning Lohlein

Henning was fortunate enough to have been chosen to exhibit at the Children’s Book Fair in Bologna, “and that opened up the world of publishing to me.”

Henning has since published more than 40 books, translated into 12 languages, and counting.

A scene from Ich Ware So Gerne illustrated by Henning Lohlein

A scene from Ich Ware So Gerne illustrated by Henning Lohlein

Initially, Henning sought out commissions by attending two of the most prestigious book fairs, Bologna in the spring and Frankfurt in the autumn, seeing as many publisher, editors and art directors as possible.

A scene from Das Leben ist Bunt, illustrated by Henning Lohlein

A scene from Das Leben ist Bunt, illustrated by Henning Lohlein

“I’m now in the position where I can develop projects before hand, which I then try and sell to a publisher at the fair,” he says. “Having been in the industry for a while, authors come to me with projects, or publishers match my illustration up with a suitable text.”

But how closely does he work with a writer in this scenario?

“Normally I just get the text, and illustrate it, having no contact with the writer, just working with the text, and interpreting it in my way,” he says.

Ludwig the Spacedog by Henning Lohlein

Ludwig the Spacedog by Henning Lohlein

Henning is excited about writing and illustrating his own stories. “Ludwig the Space Dog, published last autumn by Templar, is my first written and illustrated book,” he says.

Ludwig the Spacedog cover by Henning Lohlein “I started from the idea about a dog living in a two-dimensional world, dreaming about another dimension, which he discovers, and the reader can discover as well with using 3D glasses. It’s about the power of dreams and thinking outside the box. I also liked the idea of doing a 3D book. The pictures are obviously two-dimensional, as they are in a book, so the magic happens in the reader’s head.”

Henning describes being an illustrator as “the best job I can imagine. On a Monday morning I look forward to going to the studio, and to drawing,  painting or inventing a new story. Doing what one loves doing and getting paid for it is a privilege. I can express my ideas, and with a bit of luck, a book will come out of it.”

A scene from Was Schwimmt Denn Da by Henning Lohlein1

An illustration from Was Schwimmt Denn Da by Henning Lohlein

Find more of Henning’s work online at www.Lohlein.com.

Are you an artist or do you know an artist who would like to be showcased on SkyLightRain.com? Get in touch at judy(at)socketcreative.com.