A nautical-themed arts trail

Totterdown Front Room Arts trail artwork by Lisa Ravenscroft of LongmooseTotterdown Front Room Arts Trail erupts from 23rd till 25th November 2018 with a nautical theme – perfect for stirring imaginations in the harbourside city of Bristol!

The theme, Arts Trail organiser Gaily Orr admits, was inspired by last year’s torrential rain.

“We thought we should roll with the tide!” She exclaims. In addition, it’s a nod to Bristol’s history. “Bristol’s fortunes have been won and lost at sea and we wanted to celebrate our city’s connection with the great blue in the overriding theme of the Arts Trail.”

Never been to an art trail? This is a great one to dip your toe (or jump head first) into. The first to appear in Bristol almost two decades ago, it offers a chance for artists to showcase their work within their own homes as well as shared spaces, and for us public to a) enjoy said art, and b) get away with being nosy about other people’s décor to our heart’s content.

Each year the Arts Trail attracts thousands of visitors coming from across the city and beyond.” It’s a fantastic opportunity for local artists to display their work to the public, and it’s also a great opportunity for the public to visit, view, discuss and buy original works of arts and crafts directly from the artist.”

There’s also potential for lots of inspiration gleaning, not to mention a golden opportunity to start the Christmas shopping with some one-off originals.

Totterdown Front Room Arts Trail is on from 23rd-25th November 2018. Find full details at frontroom.org.uk. The gorgeous artwork at the top of this post is the official Totterdown Front Room Arts Trail artwork by Lisa Ravenscroft of Longmoose.

Totterdown Front Room Arts Trail_cr Judy Darley

Art worth climbing hills for

Urban Archaelogy 2 By Peter Ford

Urban Archaelogy 2 By Peter Ford

Art On The Hill returns to the Windmill Hill area of south Bristol on 7th-8th October, promising a wealth of exceptional creativity. I’ll be heading to 13 Cotswold Road to ascend the narrow stairs leading to Off-Centre Gallery. Printmaker and curator Peter Ford has long had me entranced with his unique view of the world, and this year he’ll also be joined by artists Dr. Michael McCaldin and Ruth Ander.

Urban Archaeology 1 by Peter Ford

Urban Archaeology 1 by Peter Ford

Other highlights I’m looking forward to include Stephen Mason’s ambiguous photography at 39 Gwilliam Street. Sixty artists have signed up to exhibit on the trail, so there should be plenty to tempt you.

Stephen Mason photography 2

Photography by Stephen Mason

Find full details and the trail map at www.artonthehill.org.uk.

Poems about slugs…

Knitted slug cr Woolly GoodnessFor the Southbank Bristol Arts Trail 2012 I wrote two pieces in response to Jenny Jones’ (aka Woolly Goodness) knitted slugs. This was a real challenge for me as I am absolutely definitely without a doubt not at all a fan of the slimy molluscs.

Jenny’s fuzzy slug was inspired by a childhood memory: “When I was little I dared my brother to kiss a slug, and he did… I’ve had a soft spot for the slimy rascals ever since.”

You can see more of Jenny’s work here.

 Instructions On How To Kiss A Slug

Jenny Jones kissy knitted slugClose your eyes, and hold your nose,
Pretend you’re just smelling a rose.
Purse your mouth, tight and round,
Bend down almost to the ground.
Ignore the slime, kiss him quick,
And don’t forget to wipe your lips!

Slugs Slither Slowly

Slugs slither slowly
under garden gates,
through cracks in garden walls
through each and any space.

Silently and after dark
when you’re tucked up, sleeping tight,
they wriggle in and set their mark,
waiting long into the night.

And as you snooze away the hours,
they fill their bellies with your flowers
sneaking away as morning comes
betrayed only by their sticky tums.

Ahem. The deadline for joining for the Southbank Bristol Arts Trail 2013 is 14 February 2013.